Movies

Hur Adam: Tale of a Stoic Fortitude

Hur Adam: Tale of a Stoic Fortitude

BediuzzamanSaid Nursi (1877-1960), the Turkish mystic, can be considered as the spiritual founder of modern Turkey. At a time when scorn for tradition and faith was considered as the founding principle of Turkish nationalism in the country’s embrace of authoritarian modernity and secularism under Ataturk, Nursi revived faith in the tradition by leadinng people to […]

October 16, 2014 Anwar Mohammed Read More →
Hamlet and his Kashmirian Odyssey

Hamlet and his Kashmirian Odyssey

Touchstones by which a Hamlet adaptation is measured are the ghost and the play within the play. Though these two appear only minimally on the stage, they drive the tempo of the play. Ghost is nothing but Hamlet’s subconscious which brings his hidden fears and oedipal angst out into his (as well as ours) conscious, […]

October 3, 2014 KS Shameer Read More →
Movie Review: Dedh Ishqiya

Movie Review: Dedh Ishqiya

“Dedh Ishqiya”, one of the most probable, unconventional new-age sequels from Bollywood, is a hard movie to categorize: it is a lumpy, sharp-tasting mix of emotions that’s immaculately written, directed and acted – and yet isn’t remarkable. The opening, with the black screen voice over story about a female parrot that corrupts a pair of […]

May 6, 2014 M K Jawid Read More →

Books

The Sacred Myth of the Orient

The Sacred Myth of the Orient

I was watching Francis Ford Cappola’s 2007-fantasy drama Youth without Youth about an old linguistics professor regaining youth after he was struck by lightning. The title says the rest, bringing to light the ambiguities of existence and aging. The film might disappoint you, if you are going to watch it with Cappola’s Godfather and Dracula […]

November 19, 2014 Interactive Features/Writer at large Read More →
Not Lost in Memory’s Transition: Biography Revives Proust Translator’s Life

Not Lost in Memory’s Transition: Biography Revives Proust Translator’s Life

It’s not often that a translator has a story as good as the author himself. But C.K. Scott Moncrieff’s was wild enough to seem like fiction. Moncrieff was the first person to translate Marcel Proust’s seven-volume epic, “Remembrance of Things Past” into English. He was also a poet, a soldier during World War I and a spy in Mussolini’s […]

November 18, 2014 Nina Porzucki Read More →
Who was Ali Shariati to us?

Who was Ali Shariati to us?

The question put forth by Hamid Dabashi was answered by Iranian filmmaker Mohsin Makmalbhaff. The time and the place which Makmalbhaff points to corresponds to Iran of the early 70s. He was brought up in a religiously charged atmosphere, visiting the scholar at the Masjid every day and coming to know about a new speaker […]

November 14, 2014 Ashraf. k Read More →

Person in Focus

Modiano’s Fictions: The Political Landscape

Modiano’s Fictions: The Political Landscape

There is a question Edward W Said reserves for Jewish intellectuals who write about Holocaust and atrocities against Jews: How do they read and respond to the similar genocide that the Zionist government orchestrates against Palestinians. Their answer would be the proof of their radical politics not being sectarian.  Sadly, Modiano is silent about Palestine. This […]

October 10, 2014 Interactive features Read More →

Food

International Coffee & Tea Festival

International Coffee & Tea Festival

Having probably originated in China during the Shang dynasty as a medicinal drink, it took tea almost 3000 years to become an everyday drink. An early credible record of tea drinking dates to the 3rd century AD, in a medical text written by Hua Tuo. Tea was first introduced to Portuguese priests and merchants in […]

November 20, 2014 Navas Machingal Read More →

Blogging Verses

The Spiritual Wardrobe

The Spiritual Wardrobe

Once a Sufi was asked why he wore blue robe. He replied: “The Prophet left us three things: poverty, knowledge and sword. The sword was taken by kings, who misused it; knowledge was chosen by scholars, who were satisfied with merely teaching it; poverty was chosen by dervishes, who made it a means of enriching […]

June 30, 2014 A.K ABDUL MAJEED Read More →

Fiction Shelf

Forty Rules of Life Worth Living

Forty Rules of Life Worth Living

After twenty years of marriage and building her whole life around her husband and three children, an American suburban housewife Ella Rubinstein realizes that she had not been able to make more of her life. Deep inside she becomes aware of her longing for love. Destiny puts in her hands an intriguing manuscript about the Sufi […]

July 2, 2014 Sajeela Ismail Read More →

Guest Column

Storm in the Coffee Cup

Storm in the Coffee Cup

The recent victory for the Baratiya Janata Party in the assembly constituencies of Maharashtra and Hariyana, following the landslide it had in the Indian Parliamentary election, has boosted not only the morale of various Sangh Parivar elements, but their hubris as well. Recently, there was what appeared to be cultural vigilantism by Youva Moracha, a […]

October 29, 2014 Shameer KS Read More →
Ziauddin Sardar: The Careless Critic

Ziauddin Sardar: The Careless Critic

I have just emerged safe from reading Ziauddin Sardar’s article on Muslim men. Those who are surprised at what I actually mean should understand that articles, thoughts and reflections of authors can inflict harm on you by perverting realities and misrepresenting truths while remaining earnest, sincere and disinterested and papering over the seemingly credible, but […]

October 29, 2014 Adv Zainaba Ummer Read More →
Malala and Crisis of Feminist Politics

Malala and Crisis of Feminist Politics

Malala yousafzai, a Pakistani activist working for women’s rights and education, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in October, 2014, which she shared with Kailash Satyarthi, a children’s rights activist from India, making her the youngest ever laureate in history. The media celebrated the achievement as a victory of her battle against the suppression of […]

October 27, 2014 Ummul Fayiza Read More →
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